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 The case for population reduction.

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PostSubject: The case for population reduction.    Fri Jul 25, 2014 8:51 am

The planet's current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life. But it may be reaching a tipping point.

In a new review of scientific literature and analysis of data published in Science, an international team of scientists cautions that the loss and decline of animals is contributing to what appears to be the early days of the planet's sixth mass biological extinction event.

Since 1500, more than 320 terrestrial vertebrates have become extinct. Populations of the remaining species show a 25 percent average decline in abundance. The situation is similarly dire for invertebrate animal life.

And while previous extinctions have been driven by natural planetary transformations or catastrophic asteroid strikes, the current die-off can be associated to human activity, a situation that the lead author Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford, designates an era of "Anthropocene defaunation."

Dirzo said that the solutions are complicated. Immediately reducing rates of habitat change and overexploitation would help, but these approaches need to be tailored to individual regions and situations. He said he hopes that raising awareness of the ongoing mass extinction – and not just of large, charismatic species – and its associated consequences will help spur change.

http://news.stanford.edu/pr/2014/pr-sixth-mass-extinction-072414.html

Another hit piece from the fuzzies. When I get home later we will take a look at tis flawed data. People typically buy into these propaganda pieces, oh yes, they are so well written and by people on college campuses lol
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PostSubject: Re: The case for population reduction.    Fri Jul 25, 2014 5:06 pm

Ill get this over quick.

Global biodiversity is affected by extinction and speciation. The background extinction rate varies among taxa but it is estimated that there is approximately one extinction per million species years. Mammal species, for example, typically persist for 1 million years. Biodiversity has grown and shrunk in earth's past due to (presumably) abiotic factors such as extinction events caused by geologically rapid changes in climate. Climate change 299 million years ago was one such event. A cooling and drying resulted in catastrophic rainforest collapse and subsequently a great loss of diversity, especially of amphibians\
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_biodiversity

new species vs dying ones

There is debate as to the rate at which speciation events occur over geologic time. While some evolutionary biologists claim that speciation events have remained relatively constant over time, some palaeontologists such as Niles Eldredge and Stephen Jay Gould have argued that species usually remain unchanged over long stretches of time, and that speciation occurs only over relatively brief intervals, a view known as punctuated equilibrium.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speciation

Just want to point out that many times these papers use data that is speculation and not fact, then they write their paper as if it is fact.

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PostSubject: Re: The case for population reduction.    Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:08 pm

I took a course called "Geography: Food and Population" at UWF in the early 1970's. It dealt with human population and the strains on the ecosystem due to overpopulation. It was an interesting course.

We had some guest speakers and I particularly remember several black speakers say overpopulation is a white problem. In other words, as long as blacks are a minority, they will be having lots of children and not worry about things white people worry about, like the costs of care and feeding and education of their children.

Of course, their perspective is from a minority population in the USA.

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riceme

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PostSubject: Re: The case for population reduction.    Sat Jul 26, 2014 12:08 am

Eric wrote:
I took a course called "Geography: Food and Population" at UWF in the early 1970's.  It dealt with human population and the strains on the ecosystem due to overpopulation.  It was an interesting course.

We had some guest speakers and I particularly remember several black speakers say overpopulation is a white problem.  In other words, as long as blacks are a minority, they will be having lots of children and not worry about things white people worry about, like the costs of care and feeding and education of their children.

Of course, their perspective is from a minority population in the USA.

That's funny because the data disagrees with them. I learned a lot about the concept (not the organization) of ZPG (Zero Population Growth) when I was at university.

http://www.populationconnection.org/site/PageServer

I'm not saying those are black people in the red zones on the African continent, I'm just saying those are black people in the red zones on the African continent. If you catch my drift.
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PostSubject: Re: The case for population reduction.    Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:12 am

Eric, I can see where perhaps that ideology has been taught to minorities.

I always figured other races other than white were trying to get rid of white people by out populating them.

More white people died in the United States last year than were born, a surprising slump coming more than a decade before the Census Bureau says that the ranks of white Americans will likely drop with every passing year.

Population estimates for 2012 released Thursday show what’s known as a natural decrease — a straightforward calculation of births minus deaths — of about 12,400 people among the nation’s 198 million non-Hispanic whites.

Although the percentage is small, several demographers said they are not aware of another time in U.S. history — not even during the Depression or wars — when there was such shrinkage among the dominant racial group. No other group showed a similar falloff.

Fertility rates have been slowly dropping since 2007. For white women, they are now below the level considered necessary to keep the population at a stable level. During the recession, researchers found that women who had lost health insurance or whose partners were unemployed were reluctant to have more children when they could least afford them

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/white-deaths-outnumber-births-for-first-time/2013/06/13/3bb1017c-d388-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_story.html

We are entering the "idiocracy" stage of social evolution.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icmRCixQrx8


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